Santiago

Map showing the location of the River Brass, Havana and the point of capture of the Santiago, 1830

Voyage Map


The Santiago was the fifteenth conviction of a slave ship by the Havana Slave Trade Commission. This Spanish schooner, under the command of José Rivet, began its voyage at Havana and set sail for the River Brass likely in late 1829 loaded with aguardiente, cotton goods and other merchandise. On 9 February 1830, the ship sailed from Africa with 144 people on board and 36 individuals died during the middle passage.


On 9 April, Commander Thomas Gill, in charge of the HMS sloop Sparrowhawk, was leaving Jamaica to take important dispatches to New Providence. Between Jamaica and Cuba around N18°50 and W76°31, Gill came upon the Santiago, which was leaking and had four feet of water in the hull. Rivet had gone to Santiago de Cuba to seek help and left a few of his crew on board. Gill could not "conceive himself justified in accompanying the detained vessel" instructed four of his men to take the Santiago to Havana.


By 23 April, the Santiago was sinking off the western tip of Cuba around the N22°23 and W85°30. Fortunately, the HMS Slaney, under the command of Captain Charles Parker, arrived to the scene and rescued everyone on board. The Slaney abandoned the Santiago, arrived to Havana on 27 April. Since 9 April, another 8 people died. Due to the particularities of this case, the court reached its decision on 21 May and issued emancipation certificates for 100 people.

Trial Summary


Thumbnail of Document for a Trial Summary

Register Statistics

Graph of the statistics for the register of the Santiago, 1830

Table showing the statistics for the register of the Santiago, 1830

Table showing more statistics for the register of the Santiago, 1830

Table showing more statistics for the register of the Santiago, 1830

Table showing more statistics for the register of the Santiago, 1830

Additional Resources

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