In its initial stages, the impact of the Havana Slave Trade Commission had on the overall trans-Atlantic slave trade to Cuba was minimal. Following the first conviction of a slave ship by the Havana Slave Trade Commission and the last known available register, over 300,000 enslaved Africans landed in Cuba. As a result, the 10,986 people issued emancipation certificated between 1824 and 1841 only represented approximately 3.5 percent of total number of people arriving to Cuba at this time. For more information related to estimates of the trans-Atlantic slave trade to Cuba in this period click here.

Between 1824 and 1841, the Havana Slave Trade Commission issued emancipation certificates to a total of 10,986 individuals. Of that total, 72 percent remained in Havana, 10.7 percent went to Trinidad, 10.0 percent went to the Bahamas, 4.4 went to the British Honduras and the remainder went to Grenada and Jamaica. Table 1 reflects the number of Liberated Africans who remained in Cuba, while Tables 2-6 reflect the number of Liberated Africans who resettled in Trinidad, the Bahamas, British Honduras, Grenada and Jamaica.

Even though the trials always took place in Havana, none of the enslaved Africans on board the Antoñica or the Caridad Cubana went to Cuba, rather they landed directly in the Bahamas and Jamaica, respectively.

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